A sentence by Professor B.F. Skinner, 'It occurred to me to go for a walk,' provides an opportunity to give it a framework of quantized subjectivity, as distinct from Skinner's approach of contingent reinforcement. Skinner's analysis of 'cognitive thought' is sustained, but this in turn has to be rejected by post-Einsteinian theory with respect to subjectivity, ignored in cognitive psychology and Skinnerian Behaviorism alike. Modern science begins with the complexity of events, as in theories of chaos and turbulence, and it is from this standpoint that the growing science of subjectivity made its beginnings in Q-methodology, as concourse theory. Self-reference is crucial in this development, and is advanced in terms of the everyday communicability of a culture, largely as verbal behavior. Skinner's well-known achievements in this matter remain in the determinative framework of Newtonian science. It is time for recognition of the indeterminateness of nature, and for acceptance of a science for subjectivity.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.os.2005.002
Journal Operant Subjectivity
Citation
William Stephenson. (2005). A Sentence from B. F. Skinner. Operant Subjectivity, 28(3/4), 97–115. doi:10.15133/j.os.2005.002